A little sugar IS good medicine for babies

A little sugar IS good medicine for babies – Mary Poppins was on to something: A spoonful of sugar really does help the medicine go down.

Actually, it takes only between a few drops and half a teaspoon to help take the sting out of immunizations, according to an analysis published online Thursday in Archives of Disease in Childhood.

Researchers from Canada, Australia and Brazil looked at 14 studies that compared the analgesic effects of sucrose (aka table sugar), glucose (the less-sweet component of sucrose) and water in infants who received shots. In 13 of the studies, a little something sweet seemed to help the babies, who were all between 1 and 12 months old.

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Pooling the results of those studies, the researchers calculated that administration of either sucrose or glucose reduced crying time by 12 seconds. Sweeteners also made babies cry less often.

The researchers weren’t able to determine an optimal dose of sugar because the studies used different volumes, concentrations and types of sweeteners.None of the studies reported any adverse effects from the sugars.

Scientists

had previously shown that sweet solutions relieve pain in newborns. Now pediatricians should extend the practice to babies up to 1 year of age, the researchers said. ( latimes.com )

Man saved when the mobile phone in his pocket deflects a bullet aimed at his chest

Man saved when the mobile phone in his pocket deflects a bullet aimed at his chest – A nightclub worker at a club called Halo was saved when his mobile phone deflected a bullet fired at him by a customer who had been thrown out.

Police in Atlanta, Georgia, said that parking attendant John Garber was hit in the chest when shots were fired at around 3 am.

A bullet hit the phone in his jacket pocket before it ricocheted off.

He suffered only minor injuries.

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A parking attendant was saved when a bullet, fired by a disgruntled club goer and aimed at the valet’s chest, ricocheted off his mobile phone


Witnesses said the shooters were upset they had been kicked out the club by management, returning later and opening fire.

Two people, brothers Desmond and Timothy Wright, were arrested a short time later, and two handguns were found in their vehicle.

‘You owe me a new cell phone,’ the 30-year-old Garber told his boss, National Parking owner Marc Ebersole when he spoke to him hours later on a land line, as his mobile phone was ruined.

‘He said, “I’m fine, everything’s good”,’ Ebersole recalled in an interview with the Atlanta Journal Constitution.

Ebersole added: ‘Of course we’re going to take care of his cell phone.’ ( dailymail.co.uk )

Long Ring Finger in Men Linked to Cancer Risk

Long Ring Finger in Men Linked to Cancer Risk – A new study claims that men whose index finger is longer than their ring finger are at lower risk to develop prostate cancer, The Wall Street Journal reported Tuesday.

The British Journal of Cancer said that researchers studied the ratio between the 2nd and 4th finger of the right hand in 1,524 prostate-cancer patients and 3,044 healthy people over 15 years. Men with longer index fingers were 33 percent less likely to develop prostate cancer, and men under 60 had an 87 percent lower risk.

In the prostate-cancer group, index fingers were longer in about 23 percent of the participants and shorter in 57 percent.

In the control group, index fingers were longer in 31 percent and shorter in 52 percent. The rest of the men had fingers of equal length. The findings are in line with a recent study of 366 Korean men, which found a significant association between digit ratio and prostate-cancer risk.

Finger length is determined before birth and believed to be the result of hormonal influences.

Too much testosterone appears to raise the risk of prostate cancer just as pre-natal exposure to estrogen affects a woman’s breast-cancer risk. Hand pattern might be a simple marker for prostate-cancer risk, researchers said. ( foxnews.com )